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Networking

Have you ever been to a networking event?

Was it useful? Did you enjoy it?

Most people go to networking events to get new clients. They do not go to networking events to buy something themselves.

So there’s an inherent mismatch in the focus of everyone attending.

However, there’s a way round this problem.

If you go to the networking event with the aim of having a one-to-one with people, things work very very differently.

A one-to-one is not a sales meeting. Instead, it’s a “getting to know you” meeting. This is what my business is about, these are the types of client I work with, this is why I’m good at it.

One-to-ones are a great way to get new clients. But they are a long-term, indirect strategy. We have a one-to-one, then months later I’m talking to someone else. Something they say reminds me of you, I make the introduction and you end up with a new client. And, of course, vice versa.

Once you treat your networking events as the opportunity to have one-to-ones, to get to know people and to look for referrals for people, those events become much more valuable.

It’s a slow burn, it’s a longer-term strategy, but it’s one that works.

And it makes those networking meetings much less excruciating.

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Price is just a number.

You might believe people will think it outrageous that you want to charge £50, £500, £5000 for what you do, but numbers mean different things to different people.

Back in 2013 I learnt a valuable lesson.

We had a company called EmberAds – a machine-learning advertising platform that was privacy-safe with no tracking (there’s a lesson about timing there too).

We had taken external funding. Spent a lot of someone else’s money. Over £450,000. And we had a product that wasn’t working and £6000 left in the bank.

We went to the investor and told him the score – expecting him to sue us into oblivion.

To our surprise he said “give the six grand to charity, close the company and we’ll go our separate ways”.

Surprised we asked him about the money.

He said “I fund ten companies with that amount of money and only one will be a success”.

I still remember when that initial £111,000 landed in our bank account. I’d never seen so much money. And they continued funding us; it grew to £450,000 – an incredible amount.

But to the investor it was just a number on a spreadsheet. A speck of dust on his expensive suit.

Remember that when setting your pricing – it’s just a number and you can definitely charge what you’re worth.

Posted on

Price is just a number.

You might believe people will think it outrageous that you want to charge £50, £500, £5000 for what you do, but numbers mean different things to different people.

Back in 2013 I learnt a valuable lesson.

We had a company called EmberAds – a machine-learning advertising platform that was privacy-safe with no tracking (there’s a lesson about timing there too).

We had taken external funding. Spent a lot of someone else’s money. Over £450,000. And we had a product that wasn’t working and £6000 left in the bank.

We went to the investor and told him the score – expecting him to sue us into oblivion.

To our surprise he said “give the six grand to charity, close the company and we’ll go our separate ways”.

Surprised we asked him about the money.

He said “I fund ten companies with that amount of money and only one will be a success”.

I still remember when that initial £111,000 landed in our bank account. I’d never seen so much money. And they continued funding us; it grew to £450,000 – an incredible amount.

But to the investor it was just a number on a spreadsheet. A speck of dust on his expensive suit.

Remember that when setting your pricing – it’s just a number and you can definitely charge what you’re worth.