How to keep going even when things aren’t going your way

I really like automation.

It’s something that I enjoy setting up, it’s something that saves me time, it’s something that gives me benefits whilst also using some of my core skills.

But, when things aren’t going your way, automation can also be your enemy.

Because, when things aren’t going your way, they weigh you down. You feel the weight on your shoulders, you feel it within your brain.

That weight, that heaviness; it makes it harder for you to keep going. It means the simple things that you need to be doing, they just don’t get done. The tasks that you need to complete take twice as long.

Because of that, the weight increases. The struggle continues.

The thing is, most of the time, when we feel like this, we don’t actually need a solution. We don’t need a way out.

We just need to feel like we’re moving forwards.

And that’s why automation can sometimes be your enemy.

That’s why, sometimes, you need to force yourself to do some easy activities.

Track them.

Count them.

Set yourself a simple target.

And then just watch yourself as you hit those targets.

Especially when it comes to bringing new clients into your business.

I’ve got a little something planned about this – how to escape the everyday struggle by setting yourself the right targets.

It’s coming soon…

Does your subconscious hate you?

Do you struggle with impossible deadlines?

Do you find your clients are generally unreasonable?

Do you consistently charge ridiculously low rates?

Do you struggle to make a decent living?

Do you rarely charge what you’re worth?

Do you have cheapskate clients?

Have you failed to grow your business?

Is a full pipeline a pipedream?

Are most of your clients utterly clueless?

Do you struggle to get noticed?

Are your clients often rude or abusive?

Have you gone months without landing a gig?

If the answer to six or more of those questions is “yes” then your subconscious hates you. You need to prove your subconscious wrong, get out of your own way and start attracting better clients.

Do I need a business coach?

There’s a quick answer to the question “do I need a business coach?”

NO

No-one needs a coach of any kind. 

A coach doesn’t actually do anything. 

So why are there so many coaches out there?

Well, the whole idea of coaching came from sport … in fact, it’s accepted that it’s impossible to be a successful sports person without a good coach. Because that coach makes sure you turn up, tells you what to do during training, watches how you prepare for things, makes sure you are making the best use of your time and encourages you to beat your personal bests. 

Business coaching is slightly different to sport coaching – but essentially a business coach does a similar thing. 

There are some differences. 

Coaching isn’t the same as training – training is where you follow a pre-defined programme of learning, that’s laid out in front of you. 

Coaching isn’t the same as mentoring – a mentor speaks and advises you from their experience. 

Coaching isn’t the same as consultancy – a consultant will work with you and advise you on a particular aspect of your business, and then will do at least part of the work needed to move you forwards. 

Coaching is about finding out what you want and helping you come to your own answers on how to get there. And, most importantly, holding you accountable to make sure you stick to those decisions. 

So a better question is “is it worth having a business coach?”

The simplest answer there is I have three. Sort of. 

The first is my Profit First coach. He leads me through the Profit First system, helping me pick out and adapt the parts that work well for me. So this is as much a training programme as it is a coaching programme. 

The second is my marketing coach. We discuss how I want things to be, what’s going well, what’s going badly, how it makes me feel. Then she comes up with a list of tasks, some of which are for me, some of which are for her. 

And third is my business coach. This is a pure coaching relationship. We talk about where I am now, where I want to be, what is stopping me from getting there and making sure that I approach my business in the right way to get me there. 

Personally, I love coaching. Unlike mentoring or training, it’s all about the client. I have to discover what they want, I have to help them discover their own answers and figure out what’s holding them back. And then I have to keep them accountable, so they actually make the changes that they have decided that they need. 

And because of this, I’ve designed my own coaching programme. 12 weeks to move your business towards financial security.

So if you know anyone who runs their own small business but feels that the road is too precarious, who feels that the business isn’t giving them the life they want, who is always short on time – ask them to give me a shout. There are probably some really simple things we can do that will make a huge difference. 

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How to escape the Survival Trap

Have you ever sat down and thought about your goals?

If you’ve got a business coach, then they’ve probably made you do this.

And if you haven’t got a business coach, it’s definitely worth getting one. It might sound like a weird thing to spend your money on, but running your own business can be lonely at times, it can also mean that often you’re just shouting into the void. A coach is there to listen to you and make sure you do the things you said you were going to do – which is incredibly valuable when you work for yourself.

So, back to goals.

Do you have any? Do you know what they are? Are they written down, where you can see them?

Because the goals give us a direction to move in. Even when there are obstacles in our way, we can align with the goals and choose the best path.

Imagine you’re a lawn-care specialist. Your goal is to franchise the business, so you get to work when you want to, whilst having a network of people all following your expert tuition and giving householders across the country amazing looking lawns.

But you’re not there yet. It’s still just you, driving from client to client in your little van.

One day, you notice a client has a load of leaves in their gutter. You’re a bit short on cash, so you ask if they want the gutters cleaning out (for a bit of extra money of course). Your reasoning is this – I buy myself a ladder, which costs a bit of money, but then I can offer this additional service to all my clients.

So you head off to the trade counter and buy a new ladder. You get up onto the roof and start clearing the gutters out. And while you’re up there, you notice a few loose roof tiles. An easy fix for someone with your skills. So again, you ask the client if they want it fixing, head back to the trade counter, buy the stuff you need and get them fixed.

Now you’ve got two additional services you can offer your clients.

Great eh?

Well, maybe not. You might have made a bit of extra money, but you’ve also spent a load extra – on additional tools. You’re going to need to sort out the Health and Safety for working at heights – and keep up with the certification. You’ve not spent as long on the lawn, so you’ll probably have to come back tomorrow and finish it off – so a one afternoon job has just spread out to two days.

And you’re now spreading yourself thin.

Has this extra helped you move towards your ultimate goal of a franchised lawn-care business?

Or is it just a distraction?

Even worse – is it now an excuse? I don’t have time to look into the franchising side of things because I’ve got so many gutters to clean?

It’s worth knowing what your ultimate goals are – and keeping them front of mind. So when you come to make the small decisions, you can just check them to make sure you’re still heading in the right direction.

The trouble with Post-it notes

I’m one of those people who loves stationery shops.

There’s not much better than a really heavy sketch pad and a 4B pencil.

Or a fountain pen, freshly filled with ink.

I love sketching in biro too – there’s nothing else like it.

Notepads, pens, card. It’s fantastic stuff.

It’s also really simple and understandable.

Physical.

No surprise that the most used internet application is email – because it mimics the way a paper letter works – and it’s still the best way to get in touch with someone today, despite the myriad of alternatives.

When getting your business organised, using something physical is often the very best first step.

Go to any office – how many people have their computer monitor covered in post it notes.

How many people have a whiteboard on the wall with the plan for the next few months – or their sales figures.

This is great.

It’s better to have a plan than have none.

Starting out you need to get organised as quickly and cheaply as possible.

But there comes a point when you need to move on.

While I love paper, I love fountain pens, I love notebooks, I also have a real fear around them.

What happens when I lose it?

So much important information. My to do lists, my detailed notes on how a particular project needs to work out. My diary for the next few weeks.

It would be so easy to leave it on a train. Or spill tea all over it. Or have it fall out of my bag.

And then I’d be screwed.

At one place I used to work, we had a giant whiteboard, listing out all the tasks we had for our variety of projects. Each one was placed exactly where it needed to be, so the right team knew what they had to do next. So we knew when it was due for completion. Our entire work schedule for the next few months.

At the time, we were working in a Portakabin, as we had outgrown our main office. The door for the cabin was annoying and hard to open. So you sort of had to kick it to get it open.

One day, someone came in, kicked it open, just as a gust of wind blew outside. The wind caught inside the cabin and blew half the post-its off the board and on to the floor.

In a fraction of a second, our plans for the next month were just ruined.

It was only a small issue. We guessed at where everything belonged and were back to normal in quarter of an hour.

But it’s a reminder that there comes a point where paper won’t do the job you need it to. Even worse if we were spread across multiple offices.

One advantage of “cloud” systems (which basically means that it’s someone else’s responsibility to look after it) is the data is backed up, it’s replicated and it’s accessible wherever you are.

Are you getting to the stage where it’s something you need to think about? If so, I’m happy to advise – click here to arrange a call-back at a time that suits you.

Photo by Daria Nepriakhina on Unsplash

Join our club

Not many people are brave enough to start their own business.

People like us, we took a risk.

We made a stand.

(by the way, if you’d like to subscribe to the podcast, click these links – Apple Podcasts/iTunes, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or Spotify)

We decided that we weren’t going to put up with working for an idiot or being told what to do.

We were sick of working incredibly hard, only for the rewards to go to some high-up who has no idea what we actually do each day.

We’ve chosen flexibility.

We’ve chosen responsibility.

We’ve chosen working from home, so we can look after the kids.

We’ve chosen doing things the right way.

We’ve chosen being fair with the money we earn.

But it’s difficult.

Most businesses fail within the first year.

If you’ve made it that far, congratulations. You’re doing an amazing job.

Even worse, almost all small businesses die within four years.

So if you’ve hit that milestone and made it to five years or beyond, you’re in an elite club.

The reason for this is simple.

The things that you have to do when you start a business are different (year one) to the things you have to do to keep that business running (up to year four), which in turn are different from the things you have to do make the business work without your constant attention (year five and beyond).

There are five areas where you need to make those changes – profits, operations, sales, marketing and time. Taken together, it’s a big set of changes, a lot of learning to do all at once. But break it down, attack one piece at a time, and it becomes manageable and a natural part of building a business that gives you the life you want.

If you’d like to know what could make a difference for you, check out my quick and simple quiz.

It’s designed to pinpoint the area of your business that you can make the most improvement on, for the least effort.

So you can actually get a bit of that flexibility, that extra cash, that free time and that freedom that we were all wanting when we started our businesses.

It only takes a couple of minutes to complete and could make a real difference to your business.

Photo by Miroslava on Unsplash

A confession

You probably subscribe and listen to a load of people who have job titles like “Consultant”, “Coach”, “Expert” and “Maven1“. These are people who are constantly posting in-car videos on LinkedIn, giving out advice, releasing podcasts and writing blogs. They’re obviously amazing at their jobs – why wouldn’t you want to hand over thousands of pounds in cash to them? Don’t you want that fantastic life too?

  • You can tell their lives are fantastic because they’ve sorted out their own work-life balance2.
  • You can tell their lives are fantastic because they then went on to save the lives of at least three of their clients3.
  • You can tell their lives are fantastic because their profits are going through the roof, and they’re recording that in-car video in a Lambo.
  • You can tell their lives are fantastic because they spend three months of the year hiking through the rainforest. For fun4!
  • You can tell their lives are fantastic because their team never makes a mistake and is always happy and smiling.

I’m not like that.

  • I’ve worked for myself since 2007, because I thought my boss was making a mistake and should have been listening to me. Eleven years later and the jury’s still out on whether I was right5.
  • I am very very good at what i do – especially when it comes to sorting out problems for my clients – but I’ve not really managed to sort myself out and have been winging it ever since.
  • I was really really lucky at the start, so I didn’t have to learn about how to run a business for years – no sales, no marketing and as for finance, well…
  • I then started a company with friends and we got a load of money from investors, which we spent very quickly. And that’s when things started to go really wrong.
  • I was sick of working alone, so I hired a team on the cheap6.
  • They didn’t do a great job as I didn’t know how to get them to do what I wanted7.
  • I spent all my money on these people working with me – they were cheap but took ages to get things done.
  • I was using up my evenings and weekends fixing mistakes8.

All of which meant I was ready to jack it all in.

Several times.

So this is the bit where I turn in to one of those amazing perfect consultant types.

Because I sat myself down, gave myself a good talking to and …

  • spent a load of time and effort learning about sales
  • went out networking even though I found it really uncomfortable at first
  • I read that to do sales, you need a CRM system9. So I tried out 11 different ones and eventually found one that I liked
  • I suddenly realised that I had my sales process all wrong

The sales process that I had built for myself, that I implemented in my CRM, was based around the idea of promoting myself to people. This is what I do, I’m really good at it, it will save you time and money if you hire me. Please hire me.

Then I realised that actually, the clients I worked well with were the ones where we had a relationship. Where we trusted each other. So I switched my process around to look for people I thought I could work with. And it meant I was looking for excuses to say no at every opportunity.

That was when I had another revelation – the CRM isn’t going to help you. Your process has to be right first.

This inspired me to put together a process for my team – a seven stage software development system – and I used expensive project management software to track it all.

But I totally failed to heed the lesson from before. The process didn’t work for me. The software didn’t work for me.

It just meant that I did the work I didn’t like and the team did the work I did like.

The project management software was lovely. I could keep track of my overflowing to-do list and see how late every project was – and it updated in real-time so everything got later and later right in front of my eyes.

Again – my realisation was that the software doesn’t fix things for you. I needed to get the process right before even thinking about software.

So I reset.

Now I’ve got a really small team who work on the things I don’t really like doing and I’ve kept the things I like doing to myself.

I still pay for various bits of software but I’m very careful about how I use them.

And I don’t set myself a ton of deadlines, which make me unhappy as they whizz pass, unfulfilled.

I have to say that I still don’t make very much money – I have a problem with pricing my services which mean I give away a load of valuable work for cheap.

And I still don’t have that much time – I take on too many projects and then get caught up trying to deliver them all.

And, despite all these revelations, I’m still rubbish at saying no. Which is why I have too many projects on.

But this is my story about how I’m working my way out of these things. Unlike those other consultants, those bloggers and vloggers and podcasters, it’s not a picture of a perfect life.

It’s messy and annoying and nowhere near where I want it to be.

Because I’m very good at solving problems for my clients – not so good at it for myself.

So, I’m Baz and that’s what I’m going to be talking about over the next few weeks and months.

If you want to subscribe to the audio so you never ever miss my beautiful voice, just choose your podcast app and click below:

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  1. I have no idea what that means
  2. if such a thing even exists
  3. they literally wrestled alligators
  4. Of course, they also adopt and save a whole village of brown children at the same time
  5. I was right
  6. Low wages in exchange for lots of training
  7. Don’t get me wrong – all fantastic people and good at what they did – but I was crap at looking after them
  8. and weekdays grovelling to clients
  9. basically a giant address book mixed in with a sales process

How my clients got her evenings back

One of my clients, let’s call her Sarah, had the type of business where you’re out on site all the time. She got paid to go out on site, use her expertise to evaluate the situation, lay down some remedial work, then return a few weeks or months later to assess whether it had worked. It was health and safety based and important stuff – other businesses depended on her.

As her reputation grew, as she got more and more well-known, she was spending more and more time out on the road, in the van. Of course, to manage a business, she also needed to keep up with the admin work – book-keeping, invoicing and, most importantly, job sheets. Because this stuff was safety related, if the job sheets weren’t right, there were legal implications for both her and her clients.

So she hired in some staff. This was a big step. The business could now cover a bigger region and she was spending less time in the van. But her days were spent with even more administration. Book-keeping, invoicing, collecting and filing job sheets. On top of that, she was constantly on the phone, scheduling appointments, telling the others where to be, chasing things up if anything went wrong. Which it often did.

This meant dealing with clients during the day and paperwork and administration at night. Sometimes on weekends too.

It was all getting too much.

So we put in a simple system.

As clients needed work doing, it got entered into the system. The team got notifications of where they needed to be, and when. They filed their job sheets electronically. Follow-up work was scheduled automatically. Sarah got to spend more time in the office. Instead of constant fire-fighting, she could look to growing the business. Expanding geographically.

Now she works across the whole country, proudly boasting many national chains as her clients.

And none of this was complicated. The team liked the system as it was so simple and easy to use. Sarah liked the system as it made her life so much easier.

And most importantly, she got her evenings back.

If your business is struggling, there are five areas where you can make similar, incredibly simple changes. These are:

  • Finance – the business needs a degree of profit to survive. You need to make sure the bills are paid, the team get their wages and you get something as a reward for all your hard work.
  • Operations – the business needs to run like clockwork. You need to make sure you consistently deliver a great service to your clients, or they won’t come back.
  • Sales – no business can survive without clients, so you have to make sure you’ve got new ones coming in at the right times.
  • Leads – if you want new clients, you have to get the word out there, make sure you’re attracting people and letting them know what you do.
  • Time – at the end of the day, you need to be able to switch off, safe in the knowledge that the business can look after itself. You’ve taken a huge risk in getting this far, you deserve some time to ourselves to enjoy your life.

Once you identify the area of greatest impact for YOUR business, there are simple changes that can make a massive difference.

So instead of trying to tackle them all at once, you can focus on the area that will free up the most time and money, giving you the most freedom to live your life the way you should be.

If you’d like to know which area you should concentrate on – and get a few ideas about improvements that can be made in that area – take my quick quiz. It only takes a few minutes and can point you in the right direction for making a positive change to your business.

Never trust someone who has time to do it all

So, you’ve figured out your “X”.

You’ve figured out your five year roadmap to get there.

You’ve figured out your twelve week plan to get you started.

You’ve got one thing to do this week.

Will you do it?

Life gets in the way.

It’s inevitable.

Because “X” is important. That other stuff is urgent. The urgent stuff nearly always takes priority. Normally because someone is shouting at you, you feel stressed and you want that feeling to go away.

So, at the start of each week, choose a time. Maybe it’s one morning or afternoon this week. Maybe it’s one hour per day for five days. It depends on the task you’ve set yourself, on the nature of your week.

But set aside that time. Switch off your notifications and divert your calls.

Set a timer for half an hour and say to yourself “I’m just going to work on this for till the timer rings”. Then get started.

The half hour timer works, because you know you’re not going to spend to long on it. But once you get started, you’ll probably find it easy to continue through your allotted time – the first step is always the hardest.

And, you’ll probably notice that the sky didn’t fall in while your phone was off. Plus you’ve got the satisfaction of knowing you are one twelfth of the way towards your target.

Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash