One year into starting a new business? Tips for growing growing clients within a niche?

If you work within quite a narrow niche, it can often look quite difficult to find new clients.

Especially if what you do is quite technical.

Those of us who work in that space tend to be quite detail orientated and often struggle with marketing, networking and finding clients.

But it doesn’t have to be difficult.

In fact, putting a process, a system, in place can actually make it quite easy.

First thing you need to know is who are your clients? And why would they hire you? The narrower you make this, the more focussed your niche, the easier the rest of the process becomes.

Next step is to figure out where they hang out – is it offline or online? If it’s offline, how can you get an invite to those events? If it’s online, can you subscribe or join to those places?

Can you get niche-focused testimonials and case studies from your existing clients? Can you describe how you solved their problems in their own words?

Then, go to the places they hang out, listen to what they are saying and if they have a problem, talk about how you solved something similar for one of your existing clients. Point them at your testimonials or case studies.

It will take some time, but you will soon be noticed and become known as the expert in your field – at which point people will start coming to you for help.

How to keep going even when things aren’t going your way

I really like automation.

It’s something that I enjoy setting up, it’s something that saves me time, it’s something that gives me benefits whilst also using some of my core skills.

But, when things aren’t going your way, automation can also be your enemy.

Because, when things aren’t going your way, they weigh you down. You feel the weight on your shoulders, you feel it within your brain.

That weight, that heaviness; it makes it harder for you to keep going. It means the simple things that you need to be doing, they just don’t get done. The tasks that you need to complete take twice as long.

Because of that, the weight increases. The struggle continues.

The thing is, most of the time, when we feel like this, we don’t actually need a solution. We don’t need a way out.

We just need to feel like we’re moving forwards.

And that’s why automation can sometimes be your enemy.

That’s why, sometimes, you need to force yourself to do some easy activities.

Track them.

Count them.

Set yourself a simple target.

And then just watch yourself as you hit those targets.

Especially when it comes to bringing new clients into your business.

I’ve got a little something planned about this – how to escape the everyday struggle by setting yourself the right targets.

It’s coming soon…

How to run a successful Facebook advertising campaign without spending a fortune

Have you ever spent a fortune on a Facebook advertising campaign?

It’s easily done.

Facebook is probably one of the most sophisticated advert delivery platforms around – maybe even the most sophisticated platform around (and don’t forget, it’s not just Facebook, it’s Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger too).

But that sophistication can bring you huge rewards, or massive costs.

Jumping in and naively chucking a load of cash at some boosted posts is not going to help you. Instead, you need to have a strategy for your campaign.

This image shows a small snapshot of a set of campaigns that I’m running for myself (the results are from a few hours in one day).

It shows the “Four Ts” – the four things you have to be doing if you want any chance of getting Facebook adverts to work for you.

Targeting

Never “boost a post”. Never just pick an audience for your advert off the back of an envelope.

More than anything else, choosing your target audience for your advert is the key to success.

Facebook hoovers up a ton of personal and intimate data about you and everyone you know all the time. So let’s use that to good effect – you can build audiences of people and then show your adverts only to them.

So you need to know:

  • Where do they live?
  • How old are they?
  • What brands do they like?
  • What interests do they have?
  • What car, phone or clothes do they want?
  • What sports do they follow?

You need to know all this stuff, or you’re just throwing your money away.

Testing

There are four components to a Facebook ad – and one of them is nothing to do with Facebook. You need to have an image or video to catch people’s eyes. If they look at that, then they will probably take the time to read the headline. If they read the headline, they might read the text (the copy). And if they read the text, they might click the ad and end up on your landing page.

All four of these need to be in alignment. But more importantly – because we are dealing with human beings here – you cannot be sure exactly what is going to work.

So when you start a new campaign, you need to be prepared to throw a load of money at testing. A phase where you try out different combinations of images, headlines, copy and landing pages, to see what gets the engagement, what gets you results.

Tracking

This testing process is useless if you can’t measure the results you are getting. If you look back at my screenshot earlier, you can see that I have a number of stages that are being tracked – in effect I have built a marketing funnel. At each stage, I know how many people have arrived there – and just as importantly, I know how much I have spent to get them there.

The final column on that screenshot is “arrived on sales call questionnaire”. This is the last piece of my marketing funnel and means that someone has actually booked a call with me – which is a result. And in this case, it has cost me £3.55 to get that call1.

Transform

People grow tired of adverts. Eventually, you will have shown your ad, several times, to your audience. So you need to shake it up, you need to change things around. Sometimes, this is as easy as switching the images you are using. Sometimes, you might need to change the audience definition.

Facebook uses machine learning to pick out good candidates to show your ad to. As they respond, it learns who to show it to next. Sometimes, it gets “stuck” and can’t figure out good candidates to show the advert to – and you’ll notice your statistics plummeting. If that happens, you’ll need to rebuild your audience so Facebook can reset who it’s targeting.

The Funnel

The final thing, with a Facebook campaign is never, ever point your adverts at your website. It might sound funny, but your headline, your advert, has hooked them in on a particular promise – you can fix the problem that was bugging them at that moment in time. If you send them to your website – it’s not really going to fix things for them.

Instead, you need to send them to a dedicated landing page which focusses purely on that one problem and gives them the solution – either as a free download (in exchange for an email address) or a webinar or other type of training. You have just spent money to grab their attention – don’t waste it by failing to give your audience what they want.

In effect, you are building a marketing funnel – you grab their attention and then lead them through your funnel on a defined, controlled, journey that eventually2 leads them to buy from you.

So that’s the Four Ts of Facebook advertising.

If you’re not sure about any of this marketing funnel stuff, I’ve got a free email course that explains how to build a measurable funnel that can bring predictable, reliable revenue into your business. Just enter your details below to find out more.

Unpredictable Business? Inconsistent Cashflow?





  1. This screenshot shows the stats for half of a single day – so it has cost me £3.55 so far that day to get that call booking. Over the lifetime of this campaign, each sales call has actually ended up costing me about £100. But I wouldn’t know that if I weren’t tracking my figures.
  2. and this can take time – the potential customer needs to learn who you are and has to believe you can help them and trust building can’t be rushed

Do I need a business coach?

There’s a quick answer to the question “do I need a business coach?”

NO

No-one needs a coach of any kind. 

A coach doesn’t actually do anything. 

So why are there so many coaches out there?

Well, the whole idea of coaching came from sport … in fact, it’s accepted that it’s impossible to be a successful sports person without a good coach. Because that coach makes sure you turn up, tells you what to do during training, watches how you prepare for things, makes sure you are making the best use of your time and encourages you to beat your personal bests. 

Business coaching is slightly different to sport coaching – but essentially a business coach does a similar thing. 

There are some differences. 

Coaching isn’t the same as training – training is where you follow a pre-defined programme of learning, that’s laid out in front of you. 

Coaching isn’t the same as mentoring – a mentor speaks and advises you from their experience. 

Coaching isn’t the same as consultancy – a consultant will work with you and advise you on a particular aspect of your business, and then will do at least part of the work needed to move you forwards. 

Coaching is about finding out what you want and helping you come to your own answers on how to get there. And, most importantly, holding you accountable to make sure you stick to those decisions. 

So a better question is “is it worth having a business coach?”

The simplest answer there is I have three. Sort of. 

The first is my Profit First coach. He leads me through the Profit First system, helping me pick out and adapt the parts that work well for me. So this is as much a training programme as it is a coaching programme. 

The second is my marketing coach. We discuss how I want things to be, what’s going well, what’s going badly, how it makes me feel. Then she comes up with a list of tasks, some of which are for me, some of which are for her. 

And third is my business coach. This is a pure coaching relationship. We talk about where I am now, where I want to be, what is stopping me from getting there and making sure that I approach my business in the right way to get me there. 

Personally, I love coaching. Unlike mentoring or training, it’s all about the client. I have to discover what they want, I have to help them discover their own answers and figure out what’s holding them back. And then I have to keep them accountable, so they actually make the changes that they have decided that they need. 

And because of this, I’ve designed my own coaching programme. 12 weeks to move your business towards financial security.

So if you know anyone who runs their own small business but feels that the road is too precarious, who feels that the business isn’t giving them the life they want, who is always short on time – ask them to give me a shout. There are probably some really simple things we can do that will make a huge difference. 

Arrange a call back

How Two Magic Numbers can give you a predictable and reliable business

Running a business is hard work isn’t it?

That’s the truth of it. 

Sleepless nights. 

Long hours. 

Financial stress. 

That’s how it goes for a good few years, while you get yourself established. 

And then, some magical lever gets pulled, and then you’ve made it. 

Out the other side. 

But how do you get to that magical point? What makes the magic happen?

There are actually two things that make it happen. 

Two Magic Numbers. 

These two numbers, once you know them, give you a level of certainty and confidence in your business. 

They mean you can plan ahead. 

They mean you can predict the future. 

They give you the space to concentrate on the things that matter. 

And they allow you to safely turn down the bad clients, the ones who always hammer you down on price, the ones who take up all of your time, the ones who are always complaining. 

The first Magic Number is your Conversion Rate. 

Suppose you go out and get 100 business cards from a load of networking events. You go through those business cards, calling each person up on the phone, and you end up with 30 people who are willing to have a meeting. You go to those 30 meetings and you end up with 15 people who would like you to give a presentation to the board. You give the presentations and you end up with 10 people who would like to buy your services. 

10 out of 100 leads turn into business. Your conversion rate is 10%

Your second Magic Number is your Sales Cycle Length.

Let’s say you spend all of January getting those 100 business cards. Throughout January, you’re on the phone to people, but some are busy, others are away – so your 30 meetings end up being booked across January and February. Your first new client from this round of networking signs at the beginning of February – barely four weeks after you started. But after meetings and presentations, delays and postponements, the tenth new client, signs up in April – almost 16 weeks after you got their card. 

On average, the 10 new clients you got signed up 8 weeks after you received their business card. Your Sales Cycle Length is 8 weeks

Now you know those Two Magic Numbers, you can start making predictions about the future. 

Suppose in April, you did another round of networking, but this time you only got 50 business cards. Based on your Two Magic Numbers, that suggests you’ll get 5 new clients at some time in June. 

The real power of this comes when you decide to use it to your advantage, however. Let’s say you want to raise an extra load of money to go on holiday. If you know your Two Magic Numbers, you can use them to calculate how many leads you need to generate – and when – so that you’ve got the new clients, and the money in your pocket, at just the right time. 

If you’d like to know more about how to calculate your Two Magic Numbers, check out my video and email sequence

Join our club

Not many people are brave enough to start their own business.

People like us, we took a risk.

We made a stand.

(by the way, if you’d like to subscribe to the podcast, click these links – Apple Podcasts/iTunes, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or Spotify)

We decided that we weren’t going to put up with working for an idiot or being told what to do.

We were sick of working incredibly hard, only for the rewards to go to some high-up who has no idea what we actually do each day.

We’ve chosen flexibility.

We’ve chosen responsibility.

We’ve chosen working from home, so we can look after the kids.

We’ve chosen doing things the right way.

We’ve chosen being fair with the money we earn.

But it’s difficult.

Most businesses fail within the first year.

If you’ve made it that far, congratulations. You’re doing an amazing job.

Even worse, almost all small businesses die within four years.

So if you’ve hit that milestone and made it to five years or beyond, you’re in an elite club.

The reason for this is simple.

The things that you have to do when you start a business are different (year one) to the things you have to do to keep that business running (up to year four), which in turn are different from the things you have to do make the business work without your constant attention (year five and beyond).

There are five areas where you need to make those changes – profits, operations, sales, marketing and time. Taken together, it’s a big set of changes, a lot of learning to do all at once. But break it down, attack one piece at a time, and it becomes manageable and a natural part of building a business that gives you the life you want.

If you’d like to know what could make a difference for you, check out my quick and simple quiz.

It’s designed to pinpoint the area of your business that you can make the most improvement on, for the least effort.

So you can actually get a bit of that flexibility, that extra cash, that free time and that freedom that we were all wanting when we started our businesses.

It only takes a couple of minutes to complete and could make a real difference to your business.

Photo by Miroslava on Unsplash

My client did one simple thing and it made him a ton of money

One of my clients, let’s call him Chris, had two parts to his business.

There was his online retail stuff. Where he sold items to the general public. It was good, high quality kit and he had a nice unique selling point to get the general public’s attention. It worked, and he competed against firms that were much bigger than him, who had much larger advertising budgets. He had a good niche for himself.

Then he also had a commercial arm. Where he sold his kit to specific businesses. This worked very differently. Online, a sale could be completed in minutes, at worst, in hours. But the commercial sales were different. The clients would ask for samples, they would need to know safety information and technical details to ensure that the kit met with their exacting requirements. A short sale could take days to complete. All too often, they took months.

Chris knew he needed some help as he wanted to grow the commercial arm. He expected that the help he needed would be expensive and complicated. He asked me.

The fix he was looking for was so simple, he could have kicked himself.

Every time he received a request for samples, he noted it down in his software system. Three days later, the software reminded him to call them back. He called them back. They either said “yes”, “no” or “maybe”. If they said “yes” everyone was happy. If they said “no”, Chris knew not to waste his time. And if they said “maybe” he answered their questions and then stuck another reminder in to call them again in a few days or weeks.

Such a simple system.

But it made a huge difference. 5 figures in extra sales in a couple of weeks. 6 figures of extra sales in a couple of months. Chris’s commercial side of the business was growing faster than he could have imagined.

All from one tiny little follow-up call.

If your business is struggling, there are five areas where you can make similar, incredibly simple changes. These are:

  • Finance – the business needs a degree of profit to survive. You need to make sure the bills are paid, the team get their wages and you get something as a reward for all your hard work.
  • Operations – the business needs to run like clockwork. You need to make sure you consistently deliver a great service to your clients, or they won’t come back.
  • Sales – no business can survive without clients, so you have to make sure you’ve got new ones coming in at the right times.
  • Leads – if you want new clients, you have to get the word out there, make sure you’re attracting people and letting them know what you do.
  • Time – at the end of the day, you need to be able to switch off, safe in the knowledge that the business can look after itself. You’ve taken a huge risk in getting this far, you deserve some time to ourselves to enjoy your life.

Once you identify the area of greatest impact for YOUR business, there are simple changes that can make a massive difference.

So instead of trying to tackle them all at once, you can focus on the area that will free up the most time and money, giving you the most freedom to live your life the way you should be.

If you’d like to know which area you should concentrate on – and get a few ideas about improvements that can be made in that area – take my quick quiz. It only takes a few minutes and can point you in the right direction for making a positive change to your business.

 

 

When you’re looking for clients, sometimes the answer is right under your nose

One of my clients, let’s call him Kevin, had been doing OK.

But he was in a bit of a rut. There was growing competition in his industry and he knew that if he didn’t move forwards, he’d get left behind.

But he didn’t know where to begin.

The advantage of having ten years of business experience behind you is you have a whole raft of previous clients. In Kevin’s case, lots of previous clients that he’d done one bit of work for and never spoken to again.

But Kevin’s industry was one of those where the regulations meant you needed to get certification every two years. That was a lot of repeat business he was missing out on.

So we took all his previous customer data – which was scattered all over the place.

Some was in various folders on his (creaking) server in the office.

Some was stored as emails in his mailbox.

Some was in paper reprints of his certificates that were in a filing cabinet.

We got all that data together, compiled it into one big spreadsheet. And imported that into the system.

Now he knew, at a glance, which of his previous customers he still had contact details for. He knew, at a glance, in which month their recertification was due (remember, it was every two years, so it was likely in the same month each time).

And then we added in an automated “to-call” list.

The system just looked at previous customers who had a recertification due in three months and flagged them up. If we didn’t have contact details, someone would look them up and fill it in on the database. And once we did have contact details, we would ring them, asking if they needed recertification.

This was easy.

The system picked out the prime candidates automatically.

The call was easy – your certification is probably up for renewal anyway and we’ve worked for you before.

And the call had one of three outcomes.

  • “No” or “Not Found”. In which case, we flagged them up as “do not contact”.
  • “Maybe”. Perhaps it was the right month but the wrong year. In which case, we scheduled a follow up call at a time that suited.
  • And “Yes”. In which case, Kevin had won some repeat business from someone he hadn’t spoken to in years.

Kevin was pleased. It was working. The “Yes”es were piling up.

It was an incredibly simple system.

If your business is struggling, there are five areas where you can make similar, incredibly simple changes. These are:

  • Finance – the business needs a degree of profit to survive. You need to make sure the bills are paid, the team get their wages and you get something as a reward for all your hard work.
  • Operations – the business needs to run like clockwork. You need to make sure you consistently deliver a great service to your clients, or they won’t come back.
  • Sales – no business can survive without clients, so you have to make sure you’ve got new ones coming in at the right times.
  • Leads – if you want new clients, you have to get the word out there, make sure you’re attracting people and letting them know what you do.
  • Time – at the end of the day, you need to be able to switch off, safe in the knowledge that the business can look after itself. You’ve taken a huge risk in getting this far, you deserve some time to ourselves to enjoy your life.

Once you identify the area of greatest impact for YOUR business, there are simple changes that can make a massive difference.

So instead of trying to tackle them all at once, you can focus on the area that will free up the most time and money, giving you the most freedom to live your life the way you should be.

If you’d like to know which area you should concentrate on – and get a few ideas about improvements that can be made in that area – take my quick quiz. It only takes a few minutes and can point you in the right direction for making a positive change to your business.

Feel like you’re only just keeping your head above the water?

You’re in the car park. It’s 1:55 in the afternoon. Your phone buzzes again. You sigh, picking it up, the dread weighing on your shoulders.

What a surprise! Yet another problem.

That seems to be the story every day at the moment. Every hour. You’re constantly firefighting, always dealing with issues, never switching off.

And now it’s 1:56.

Your kid’s school play starts in four minutes.

If you can just make this phone call, tell Claire in the office to call the client and say you’ll get back to them later this afternoon … then you can get out of the car, run into school and you might only miss the first couple of minutes. You just need to make this call…

It’s overwhelming isn’t it?

And, because it’s your business, you have to carry it on your shoulders.

It weighs you down. Almost like you’re drowning.

The thing is, you’re not alone. I know. I’ve been in that car. For me, the Christmas Concert is the one that springs to mind.

Many of us, who started our own businesses, have been through exactly the same thing. We started out confident in our abilities. We knew we were great at what we did. We knew we could undercut the competition on price. And things went really well at first. In fact, we had so much work, we even took a few people on to help us out.

But that’s when the problems started.

Because, even with the extra bodies, the business still took up loads of our time.

Think about it… when things are going well, you’re out there looking for new clients. But when things go wrong, it’s on you to sort it out.

Sometimes it even feels like you’re spending as much time baby-sitting the staff as you are doing the job. Every decision comes through you. Every complaint comes through you. Everything needed to be double-checked and triple-checked.

It’s exhausting.

So now you’re spending so much of your time dealing with all this stuff and you’ve totally forgotten about why you started the business in the first place.

What happened to loving the work?

The flexible hours?

The extra cash?

The freedom?

An answer in under 3 minutes

The really tricky bit is that, once you get to a certain stage in your business, you need to switch things around. The tactics that got you this far won’t get you any further. In fact, they’re positively slowing your business down.

And driving you up the wall.

It’s time to make changes.

But you can’t do it wholesale though, that’s too much to take in one go. Instead, you just need to take it one step at a time.

Pick off the area that you can have the most impact in, concentrate on getting that working right, then take a moment to relax. As now you’ve got a bit of breathing space.

But where do you begin? How do you know which area will actually give you that space?

An answer in under 3 minutes

Every growing business has at least one of these five main areas that could be improved:

  • Finance – the business needs a degree of profit to survive. We need to make sure the bills are paid, the team get their wages and you get something as a reward for all your hard work.
  • Operations – the business needs to run like clockwork. We need to make sure we consistently deliver a great service to our clients, or they won’t come back.
  • Sales – no business can survive without clients, so we have to make sure we’ve got new ones coming in at the right times.
  • Leads – if we want new clients, we have to get the word out there, make sure we’re attracting people and letting them know what we do.
  • Time – at the end of the day, we need to be able to switch off, safe in the knowledge that the business can look after itself. We’ve taken a huge risk in getting this far, we deserve some time to ourselves to enjoy our lives.

Once you identify the area of greatest impact for YOUR business, there are simple changes that can make a massive difference.

So instead of trying to tackle them all at once, you can focus on the area that will free up the most time and money, giving you the most freedom to live your life the way you should be.

If you’d like to know which area you should concentrate on – and get a few ideas about improvements that can be made in that area – take my quick quiz. You can do it on your phone, sat on the sofa.  It only takes a few minutes and can point you in the right direction for making a positive change to your business.

An answer in under 3 minutes